Program

Monday

Time Speaker Title
8:30-9:00 Coffee
9:00-9:15 Peter Quinn Welcome to ICRAR
9:15-9:30 Darren Croton ANITA Address
First Session Chair: Greg Poole
9:30-10:00 Darren Croton How to find the most massive host halos in any galaxy survey
10:00-10:30 Alan Duffy HI in a Simulated Universe
10:30-11:00 Coffee
Second Session Chair: Daniel Price
11:00-11:30 David Parkinson Bayesian Model Averaging and the primordial power spectrum
11:30-12:00 Greg Poole Monte-Carlo Markov Chain Methods: An Introduction
12:00-12:30 Simon Mutch Monte-Carlo Markov Chain Methods and their Application to Galaxy
12:30-2:00 Lunch
Third Session Chair: Geoffrey Bicknell
2:00-2:30 Max Bernyk Cone factory
2:30-3:00 Warrick Lawson Nearby young star clusters as dynamical laboratories
3:00-3:30 Ashkbiz Danehkar Planetary nebula as a cosmic distance indicator
3:30-4:00 Stuart Sim Testing explosion models for Type Ia supernova
6:00-? Unofficial Conference Dinner Swan Brewery

Tuesday

Time Speaker Title
9:00-9:30 Coffee
First Session Chair: Alan Duffy
9:30-10:00 Daniel Price 5 things you didn’t know about supersonic turbulence
10:00-10:30 Geoffrey Bicknell Formation Modelling.
10:30-11:00 Yuri Levin The stars near SgrA* black hole
11:00-11:30 Coffee
Second Session Chair: Yuri Levin
11:30-12:30 Chiaki Kobayashi Chemical Enrichment in the Carbon-enhanced damped Lyman alpha System
12:00-12:30 Marie Martig Formation of spiral galaxies
12:30-1:00 Ross Parkin 3D hydrodynamical models of the colliding winds in Eta Carinae and WR22
1:00-2:30 Lunch
Third Session Chair: Darren Croton
2:30-3:00 Paul Lasky Magnetic Fields in Magnetars
3:00-3:30 Signe Riemer-Sorensen Constraining neutrino mass using the WiggleZ galaxy survey
3:30-4:00 Robert Soria Radio loud and radio quiet non-nuclear black holes

Abstracts

Speaker Title Abstract
Darren Croton How to find the most massive host halos in any galaxy survey
Alan Duffy HI in a Simulated Universe Creating predictions for the HI distribution within the Lambda CDM paradigm are compounded by the need to resolve length-scales from star forming molecular clouds to the intergalactic cosmic web. Utilising a series of high resolution cosmological volumes simulations (OWLS) we will test the HI mass function evolution in redshift and sensitivity to different physics schemes such as Supernovae feedback and the effect of Active Galactic Nuclei on the HI distribution.
David Parkinson Bayesian Model Averaging and the primordial power spectrum Cosmological parameter uncertainties are often stated assuming a particular model, neglecting the model uncertainty, even when Bayesian model selection is unable to identify a conclusive best model. Bayesian model averaging is a method for assessing parameter uncertainties in situations where there is also uncertainty in the underlying model. In this talk, I introduce Bayesian methods and Model Averaging, before applying it to the estimation of the parameters associated with the primordial power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations.
Greg Poole Monte-Carlo Markov Chain Methods: An Introduction Bayesian statistical analyses are becoming increasingly common in astrophysical literature with Monte-Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) methods of model parameter estimation featuring prominently. I will give a brief introduction to this powerful statistical approach and use several examples drawn from my own recent research to illustrate the practical issues involved in its implementation.
Simon Mutch Monte-Carlo Markov Chain Methods and their Application to Galaxy I will discuss the suitability and power of MCMC parameter estimation methods with respect to the problem of “tuning” modern galaxy formation models.  I will then present some preliminary results, as well as discuss the new possibilities for future galaxy formation models which are made possible by such a technique.
Max Bernyk Cone factory
Warrick Lawson Nearby young star clusters as dynamical laboratories PMS star clusters are excellent laboratories for studying dynamical interactions. Examples are the nearby eta Cha and epsilon Cha clusters; sparse, compact, ~10 Myr-old systems deficient by a factor of 2 in low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Sensitive searches have completed the core population and found no members in the immediate field, to 2-3 times the core radius. The latest photometric and proper motion catalogues have sufficient precision to reliably detect members distant from the core. Observational constraints are severe; candidate members must be photometrical consistent with core members, have Li and other spectral indicators consistent with the cluster age, and have space velocities consistent with ejection early in the clusters life. In the case of eta Cha, candidates members have now been detected up to 5.5 degrees spatial separation from the core. NBODY modelling broadly reproduces the characteristics of these systems.
Ashkbiz Danehkar Planetary nebula as a cosmic distance indicator
Stuart Sim Testing explosion models for Type Ia supernova Aside from being spectacular displays in their own right, Type Ia supernova explosions have a key role in measuring the expansion history of the Universe and synthesizing the iron group elements. But what is their origin? To test theoretical explosion models it is necessary to compute synthetic spectra and light curves for comparison with observations. For this, Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations have proven to be a powerful tool, particularly for multi-dimensional models. I will describe the Monte Carlo method we use to perform such calculations and overview results obtained by its application to modern hydrodynamical explosion models.
Daniel Price 5 things you didn’t know about supersonic turbulence I will discuss some of our recent simulations of supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds, the statistics of which are relevant to the star formation process. As a telling lesson for theorists everywhere I will illustrate some of the thorny issues in comparing the results of turbulence calculations done with different numerical methods and at different resolutions.
Geoffrey Bicknell Formation Modelling. Relativistic jets wreak havoc in the interstellar medium well outside the black hole from which they are launched. In this work carried out by Alex Wagner and myself we have conducted 14 high resolution simulations of relativistic jets interacting with an inhomogeneous ISM. We have determined the ratio of jet power to Eddington luminosity which is required for a jet to inhibit star formation in a forming galaxy. This is a function of jet power and the density and porosity of the interstellar medium. All jets with powers in excess of 1043 ergs/s can influence star formation in the host galaxy.
Yuri Levin Formation Modelling. Many young stars reside in the immediate vicinity of the SgrA* black hole. On the other hand, in the same region the population of the old stars is severely depleted. Both of these facts are in conflict with prior theoretical expectations. In this talk I will propose an explanation for both how the young stars are born and how the old stars are depleted near SgrA*, and discuss the implications for other galactic nuclei.
Chiaki Kobayashi Chemical Enrichment in the Carbon-enhanced Damped Lyman alpha System We show that the recently observed elemental abundance pattern of the carbon-rich metal-poor Damped Lyman alpha (DLA) system is in excellent agreement with the nucleosynthesis yields of faint core-collapse supernovae of primordial stars. The observed abundance pattern is not consistent with the nucleosynthesis yields of pair-instability supernovae. The DLA abundance pattern is very similar to that of carbon-rich extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, and the contributions from low-mass stars and/or binary effects should be very small in DLAs. This suggests that chemical enrichment by the first stars in the first galaxies is driven by core-collapse supernovae from 20-50 solar mass stars, and also supports the supernova scenario as the enrichment source of EMP stars in the Milky Way Galax
Marie Martig Formation of spiral galaxies
Ross Parkin 3D hydrodynamical models of the colliding winds in Eta Carinae and WR22 Massive stars possess powerful stellar winds. In a binary system consisting of two such stars, the Wind-wind collision generates a region of hot thermalized plasma which may emit prolifically at X-ray wavelengths. Also, depending on the parameters of the stars and of the binary orbit the wind-wind collision shocks may be violently unstable. Results are presented from 3D adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamical models of the binary systems Eta Carinae and WR22 which include radiative cooling and the radiative driving of the stellar winds. The models provide an exceptional insight into the turbulent nature of the wind-wind interaction. Comparisons are made between the model X-ray emission and observations acquired with the RXTE and XMM-Newton satellites, leading to some interesting conclusions about both of the systems examined.
Paul Lasky Magnetic Fields in Magnetars The recently discovered black hole jet system S26 in NGC7793 has the highest kinetic power ever found in a non-nuclear source, much higher than its luminous power. We suggest that S26 is to ordinary ultraluminous X-ray sources what kinetically dominated quasars are to luminous quasars. At the other end of the jet power scale, a subclass of Galactic stellar-mass black holes (such as the microquasar GRS 1758-258) have jet powers 20 to 50 times lower than predicted from their X-ray luminosities and masses. The theoretical question to address is: what determines the black hole jet power, for a given accretion rate?
Signe Riemer-Sorensen Constraining neutrino mass using the WiggleZ galaxy survey Despite being the smallest experimentally observed particles, the neutrinos provide one of the greatest challenges for modern physics. The Standard Model of particle physics describes them as being exactly mass-less. Nonetheless, neutrino oscillation experiments provides precise measurements of their mass differences, but not the overall mass scale. Massive neutrinos have a significant effect on the structure formation history of the Universe. The neutrinos are relativistic in the early Universe where they free stream out of overdensities, thus spreading out the gravitational potential and damping the growth of structure on scales smaller than the free streaming length. The observable effect is a damping of the power spectrum at small scales, which can be measured from galaxy surveys such as WiggleZ.
Robert Soria Radio loud and radio quiet non-nuclear black holes The recently discovered black hole jet system S26 in NGC7793 has the highest kinetic power ever found in a non-nuclear source, much higher than its luminous power. We suggest that S26 is to ordinary ultraluminous X-ray sources what kinetically dominated quasars are to luminous quasars. At the other end of the jet power scale, a subclass of Galactic stellar-mass black holes (such as the microquasar GRS 1758-258) have jet powers 20 to 50 times lower than predicted from their X-ray luminosities and masses. The theoretical question to address is: what determines the black hole jet power, for a given accretion rate?